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English 35
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
mandela. flags across the country remain at half-staff and will stay that way until mr. mandela is buried. michelle kaczynski is outside his home. tell us what you are seeing there. >> singing and dancing until at least 3:00 in the morning. even on the second day. i think what immediately strikes you and touches you is the incredible diversity of this crowd. people still coming together with their entire families and their friends. they will come here with a feeling of togetherness of truly moving sense of community. one boy 7 years old, drew a picture of house and trees. he drove here from a tiny village four hours away. she said a school was built. she said because of mandela, her child and the other kids there have a good education. plus, a huge pad of flowers on the gates lead to go mandela's home. people having their own gatherings. they will come here where they feel closer to mandela where he lived as well as closer to each other. >> michelle, we're having a little bit of trouble hearing your audio. i have to tell you what i love is how this nation, their mourning is so joyful. the
, actually the marque was a big part of it. it said welcome home mr. and mrs. mandela. there were a huge crowds here, more than 100,000 people, there was a huge parade. a lot of people we spoke to today found out about his death as they were leaving work, and seeing this marque. and for people here, his sit sit brought a bit of hope. a lot of people remember him riding by is pointing at the apollo theater. he just mentioned how his visit game hope. people just appreciated him making the stop, when he could have stop sod many other places. so certainly sadness, and a lot of fond memories coming from the people that were here those years ago. so jonathan -- what else is expected -- are there any events expected to happen at the apollo tonight? >> well, not tonight, like i said -- you just have started here. people are finally just stopping by, many people sharing memory as lot of people have stopped by to speak to us, and say i remember back in 1990 that we were standing -- we were here on top of the marque. some people remember being -- really at this point no sort of planned memorial, or
with us. mr. mandela's death comes at a period of deep unease, writes the new york tiles. the past year and a half, the country faces the most serious unrest provokeed by a wave of angry miner, a deadly response on part of police, messy leadership struggle and deepening fishers between south africa's ruler masters. members of the party have said mr. mandela's near saintly legacy from years of struggle has been eroded by a scramble of self enrich. . nelson mandela died with his family around him at a hospital. it was brought to us by the south african president. he was born in transic south africa. he moved to end the regime. the impact of his efforts reconciled generosity and to find the common ground between humanity's higher values and his own power. john carlin once described him and said he'll ultimately reach beyond south africa's borders. this coming to us from black borders. prior to doing so, mandela earned a bachelor's degree during which time he was elected onto the student's representative council and suspended from college for joining a protest boycott. he was eququalified i
and since thursday night when mr. mandela's passing was announced. tomorrow will be truly significant and unique event. there are perhaps 95,000 people who will be allowed into the stadium and there will be tens and thousands more who will be try to be near there. the event of course is captivated the country and the world. security will be unprecedented. the south african security forces used protecting mr. mandela, the secret service and security forces here are sfam with protecting with mr. mandela. this is not an unknown island. of course, anything is possible about the they are taking unprecedented steps to make sure the stadium is secure. the treats in the area near here will be closing down in a couple of hours and private vehicles will not be allowed anywhere near the stadium. it is expected to be an emotional day. the program has just been released and there will be remarks by several of mr. mandela's grandchildren and comments from a former political prisoner along with him who served 26 years on rob bin island and remarks from heads of states like president obama and leader
. mandela and mrs. mandela in the flat in london. it was a small apartment. we met and it was extraordinary. i was in the room with living history. i was in the presence of greatness. this man's humility about the combination, there is no question that nelson mandela was a man who embodied what martin luther king jr. talked about in referring to the spirit of the times. here was a man who was out of a sense of directioning history and those around him. a man who didn't presume to be the mouth piece for god. nevertheless spoke for millions of people not only in south africa, but around the world. the courage it took to for give south africa into its future. his love ethic that they spoke about was the predicate for the expansion of opportunity for africans who were black to join with africans who were white and others to forge the future of that nation. what's interesting as many criticize mr. obama here, president obama who was encouraged by him. i was at the white house when the film was screened. i had the opportunity to see barack obama introduce a film about nelson mandela was a bit of
. i was the wife of a south african freedom fighter, belonged to a rival organization than mr. mandela's. my husband was a pat, pan african congress, mr. mandela was founder of anc, african national congress, others south african national union. i was used to those men and a few women shouting and screaming at each other. they were really arch rivals. when mr. mandela came, he didn't raise his voice. he didn't argue with anybody. he didn't put anybody down. they were rivals. i had never met a south african who wasn't shouting and really angry all the time. i know he was angry, but he didn't use his energy foolishly. so it was a year after that he was imprisoned. i became friends with his wife then, winnie mandela. and we continued to support each other over the years and over the oceans. and she would tell me how he was. he wasn't vitt uperative with t guards. i was part of hillary clinton's delegates when he was inaugurated. i sat there and watched the guards, who had guarded him for 27 years, sitting in the right sights, in the best seats, invited by mr. mandela. not to say look how
. your thoughts on nelson mandela. caller: mr. mandela was a man of peace. of forgiveness -- a man forgiveness. a man of inspiration to millions of people around the world. that the truly sad same cannot be said about the man who spoke about earlier today from the white house. noson mandela had divisiveness. he had no enemies. he had -- he did not desire to cause division. barack obama is low. nelson mandela -- host: thank you for your calls. lots of reactions from the former president, george w. bush issuing a statement. -- president obama shortly after the announcement of nelson mandela's death spoke to reporters on his thoughts on the passing of nelson mandela. >> at his trial in 1964, nelson mandela close to statement saying i have fought against white domination. i have fought against black domination. ahave cherished the ideas of democratic and free society in which all persons live together with equal opportunities. it is an ideal which i will hope to live for and to achieve. if needs be, it is an idea for which i'm prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that ideal, and m
. >> the government has taken a firm decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> reporter: mandela emerged behind bars without bitterness to resume his campaign. >> africa. >> nelson mandela set aside his personal freedom for our personal freedoms. >> reporter: as south africa's first black president mandela remained a humble man, taking delight in a new york ticker tape parade. dancing at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. as promised he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> be south africa has been a despottic state throughout almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela is one of the best and optimistic qualities that he has to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man who has done his duty on earth. >> here with us now, a giant of civil rights. you got a chance to interview president mandela in february of 1990 after he came out of prison after 27 years. how did you finds him? how
comparisons with mr. mandela. mr. obama often noted privately and publicly that his sacrifices would never compare to mr. mandela's. aide to mr. obama said he was uncomfortable when people drew parallels between them as often as they did. this is from "the new york time times", not "the washington post." i apologize. how fair are those comparisons? they are inevitable and now we're going to continue to read and hear more about them over the next few days and weeks. how fair are they? >> it depends on which mr. mandela you're talking about. >> and which mr. obama you're talking about. >> one of the things that we talk about is mr. mandela as a tremendous humanitarian leader and so on. and he really was. but he was also a politician. and he also had to hold together a coalition, find the way to steer his country forward as the first black representative in that democratically elected government. in that way, they do have a great deal in common. you do see a very nervous and frightened group of white south africans wondering exactly what his presidency meant for them. and in some ways, you sa
us the background of that photo. >> mr. mandela came to the understand to attend the clinton inaugural. he was very close for the clinton family. in fact the clintons visited the mandelas early this year and last year, and when secretary of state clinton visited south africa before she left office, but he wanted to participate. he wanted to know more about how we ran campaigns here. he wanted to be part of the celebration, because he had a great deal of respect. and i was with my friend yolanda caraway to escort him to the inaugural ball. he wanted to see the city. >> former president clinton -- tweeted i'll never forget my friend madeiba, and you can see the love there. david cameron, the prime minister of britain is now speaking. i think we're going to try to fix that audio. once we do, we'll hear david cameron, the british prime minister. he's paying his respects over in london right now once we've fixed that technical problem, we'll hear what he has to say. he's paying his respects. i want to show our viewers some video. february 11th, 1990. right now a very, very special
the president of the south africa, mr. nelson mandela. [applause] >> your majesties, your royal highnesses, distinguished guests, comrades, and friends, today, all of us do, by our presence here, and by our celebrations in other parts of our country and the world confer glory and hope to newborn liberty. out of the experience of an extraordinary human disaster that lasted too long must be born a society of which all humanity will be proud. our daily deeds as ordinary south africans must produce an actual south african reality that will reinforce humanity's belief in justice, strengthen its confidence in the nobility of the human soul, and sustain all our hopes for a glorious life for all. all this we owe both to ourselves and to the peoples of the world who are so well represented here today. to my compatriots, i have no hesitation in saying that each one of us is as intimately attached to the soil of this beautiful country as are the famous jacaranda trees of pretoria and the mimosa trees of the bushveld. each time one of us touches the soil of this land, we feel a sense of personal renew
peacefully last night surrounded by his family. mr. mandela, became a symbol of hope around. world for his life long struggle against the apartheid system of racial segregation in his country. he spent 27 years in prison for defying that system. after his release he sought not revenge but reconciliation. mr. mandela went on to push for one of the most progressive constitutions on planet and became south africa's first democrat exly elected black president. he chronicled end of apartheid and mandela's election and serving as african correspondent for the bbc. tom, thanks for joining us today with your thoughts. and what were they when you first got the news that mandela pass ad way? >> i had a lot of emotions both at a personal level and a professional one. i had the same feelings that everyone had, this was absolute titan of the global stage whose like we'll probably never see in our lifetimes again. these sort of men only only come around everyone hundred years or some i have memories when i met him during the time i was in south africa, particularly of his personal warmth and humor. i re
told bishop tutu i disagree with you and with mr. mandela because tutu is that way as well. but i respect you. so why can't you guys in the republican party bring that to the the fore? >> well, nelson mandela stood up against a great instice and willing to pay a huge price for that and that's the reason he mourned today because of that struggle that he performed. you are right, what he was advocating for was not necessarily the right answer, but he was fighting against some great injustice. and i would make the argument that, you know, we have a great injustice going on right now in this country with an everincreasing size of government that is taking over and controlling people's lives. and obamacare is front and center in that. i agree with talking points, your points earlier which is the center focus of the 2014 election, mu be obamacare. and all of its aspects and the cool thing about obamacare is it is not only bad for the economy and bad for people's health. it's also bad for freedom of conscience. it's bad on whole variety of issues that will energize all across america. >>
life of. >> robert makes a very important point. yet politics has not been absent in the days since mr. mandela's passing, kate. i think what had happened in some corners of the conservative blogosphere, twittersphere -- i'm not from the 20th century. please don't ask me to use these words. on his facebook page commenters, including this person who couldn't spend his name called him a commune nist involved in torture, terror, murder and they have lost a lot of respect for senator cruz. it's amazing to me the vitriol that exists in parts of american society. people like nelson mandela who should be a hero for everybody the world over and especially here in the united states. >> he was a political person so people are going to have political feelings about him. kudos to senator cruz for what's being said on his facebook and going. he obviously wanted to go. >> which is less about nelson mandela and more about ted cruz. jonathan, in fairness if we're talking about conservatives who are quote, unquote, doing the right thing, newt gingrich called nelson mandela one of the greatest leaders o
the generation of prisoners who were there with mr. mandela would simply not see a free south africa. and those who were in our 20s at the time, i thought by the time change came in south africa, we would be pretty old and not make a contribution to a democratic south africa. i thought it would be extremely bloody and conflict ridden. and we would inherit a country that would take time to heal and rebuild and just get people together again. i was convinced that it was never going to happen in -- in -- so soon. even by '85 i didn't think it would happen in the lifetime of many, many people who have played a good and leading role in building a democratic south africa. >> and nelson mandela was freed from prison in 1990 as inaugurated as president of south africa in 1994. thank you so much for joining us and reflecting on this important day. our deepest on dole lances to you and everyone in south africa on this huge, huge loss. he went on to become the ceo of the nelson mandela foundation, by the way. >>> joining us later today, i'll be edit sitting down and speaking with former president bill cli
. warmly welcomed at the white house. >> mr. mandela, a man who embodies the hopes of millions. >> reporter: it was bill clinton with whom he would develop the closest bond. mandela, now president of south africa, visited the white house during the darkest days of the clinton presidency. he gave his friend a boost. >> our morality does not allow us to desert our friends. >> reporter: this friendship clinton treasures to this day. >> we just hit it off. i just adored him. he was always, you know, he was a true friend. >> reporter: mandela, as an ex-president, met with george w. bush in 2005. but there was no love lost there. mandela was one of bush's harshest critics when it came to iraq. when we talked to bush about the ailing mandela earlier this year, there were no hard feelings. >> he promoted freedom. he was a really great leader. he was smart and capable. and made his mark. >> reporter: obama only met mandela once. ever so briefly as a junior senator. but his connection may be the most profound. it was mandela, he says, who awakened him to the wider world. inspiring him to political ac
want to show you the marquee back in 1990 when nelson mandela visited here. it says, mr. and mrs. a&m, welcome home. we love you. we love you. we love you. over the course of that visit to new york city, 750 people throughout the city saw him and of course, chris, you might remember that. mario cuomo was the governor, dinkins was the mayor and nelson mandela made a big splash here and big impression on new york when he visited here. >> i remember many said they never met anyone like nelson mandela. we'll check back in with you later on. >>> right now we get perspect e perspective, though, nelson mandela devoted himself to humanitarian work. sir richard branson worked with nelson mandela on many projects and helped him form a group called the elders. a very important part for nelson mandela to what should be his legacy. sir richard branson joins us now. thanks for joining us. great to have you on the show. i want to say first, nelson mandela was a personal friend as well as a role model and i am sorry for your loss this morning. but thank you for joining us. >> thank you very much.
and soweto. different creeds and colors honoring the same man as father. >> this is a special mass for mr. mandela. >> reporter: tears and keers capturing the love for father as south africans called mandela. the greatest memorial may be the faces, black and white together, parents bring children who will live a life madiba made possible. >> they were born free in south africa. they experience all the fruit. >> reporter: which pride and legacy, there is also lochlts one man has mandela's image on his car and says he hasn't been able to sleep or eat sense he heard the news. >> how can i live without madiba? i'm so sad. >> reporter: the long good bye will continue all week, adding to the legend and legacy of nelson mandela. you know on friday they had a ceremony for nelson mandela, a traditional african one where they closed his eyes. wherever he is, i hope his ears are opened, to hear this, this is what they say would be the greatest memorial for fell nnel mandela, living apart. that's what's going on right now as a buildup to tomorrow t. kind of sendoff and a memorial we haven't seen. 90,
that is emanating from there. i have to say that i read with a chuckle about the first time that you met mr. mandela back in 1990. i want you to tell people because you were literally star struck. >> i absolutely was. i've been blessed to be around some phenomenal people, some great leaders, but there's no one like nelson mandela. so yes, the first time i was in his company was immediately after we had organized a glorious ticker tape for him parade down broadway in manhattan. we took him into city hall in new york, and had found myself alone with him in the mayor's office. and i didn't realize that i had been just staring at the man for probably ten minutes till i heard a voice say, excuse me, young man. can i trouble you for that glass of water. i realized that he had probably asked me several times for some water after being out in the heat and this long parade. i raced, got him the water and darn near spilled it all over him, i was so incredibly nervous and in awe of him. even though when you were around him, you were in awe, there was something about him that will created an accessibility, too.
of the congress, it is my great privilege and i deem it a high honor and personal pleasure to present to you mr. nelson mandela, deputy president of the african national congr s congress. >> it was a news congress back in 1990, crowds of americans, black person americans, all sorts of americans turned out in droves for the chance to be in the presence of, in the remote vicinity of men of rare courage, character and compassion. you probably heard of a bronx cheer. check out what happened when nelson mandela showed up at yankee stadium back then. >> you now know who i am. i am a yankee! [ cheers ] . >> and i don't even think a red sox fan would mind that. i speak as a red sox fan. you would never know, though, looking at that scene, for nelson mandela to be there at yankee stadium for him to stand on capitol hill and be hailed by democrats and republicans in congress. for that trip to the united states to happen back in 1990, nelson mandela had to receive a special waiver from the u.s. department of state. otherwise, he never would have been allowed in the country. that's because he was a member
of december. >> thank you, mr. speaker. >> nelson mandela was a towering figure in our lifetime. we are here to celebrate his character, his achievements, and his legacy. condolence books have been organized. tos evening we will fly south africa to attend the service and johannesburg. and his royal highness, the prince of wales, will be there for the funeral. his family, his friends, and the millions in south africa, and those around the world, our morning and today. mourning him today. though humanity bears ever upwards, away from brutality. but it is not so. progress is not just handed down. it is one through struggle -- struggle.h nelson mandela was the embodiment of that struggle. the evil ofr forget apartheid and its affect. separate buses, separate schools, and even separate pews in church. interracial relationships banned. a rolling which that explained man's inhumanity to man. this was made possible by extreme brutality, and some of this was by south african authorities. ,is journey spanned six decades through nearly three days of incarceration, through his negotiations that led to t
on "jansing and co." back in june about nelson mandela's legacy. in a statement following his death, mrs. evers said, quote, we are all students of mandela for he taught us about faith, perseverance, and devotion to one's ideals. morgan freeman, sydney patiya both portrayed him in films. the long walk to freedom chronicles his life from childhood through his inauguration. it also looks at his relationship with his wife winnie played by naomi harris. and the film's director justin chadwick talked to me about the film. >> we all know mandela the great political leader, the activist, but we don't know him as a young man. as a man who loved cars, tailoring, who is the most amazing lawyer in his early days in the first black lawyer in johannesburg. so we want to explore a mandela that hadn't been seen before that people don't know, that's not in the history books. >> last night prince william and his wife kate attend the uk premiere for that film in london. they along with the rest of the audience found out about his death while the credits were rolling. >> we're just reminded of what an extr
will leave it there. thanks for coming in. >> thank you. >> up next, remembering nelson mandela, the president and mrs. obama are on the way to south africa right now for what is becoming a massive memorial, perhaps the largest in world history. heads of state will be gagering to pay respects. it will be a security nightmare for agents around the world. >> cans on across the country thanks to a wintry mix. we will have none other than jim cantore who will be live from the snowy northeast. a look ahead at the politics planner. >> it will bed bidens for them for a holiday celebration. you are watching "the daily rundown" only on msnbc. once upon a time, an insurance clerk stumbled upon a cottage. [knock] no one was at home, but on the kitchen table sat three insurance policies. the first had lots of coverage. the second, only a little. but the third was... just right! bear: hi! yeah, we love visitors. that's why we moved to a secluded house in the middle of the wilderness. just the right coverage at just the right price. coverage checker from progressive. you may be muddling throu
and economic future? i'm now joined by a mandela expert, douglas foster. he is the author of "after mandela, the struggle for freedom in post-apartheid south africa." mr. foster, thank you for coming on, sir. president mandela has been out of politics for a long time. he's been certainly out of the government for a long time. >> that's right. since 1999. >> right. jacob zuma is the president right now. when you speak of after mandela, we have been in the after mandela period, or are you referring to something else? >> well, in a sense we have been in an after mandela period but as long as the old man as he's known in south africa was alive, there was a sense in which he exercised a kind of moral persuasion in the country so i think now, today, with the death of nelson mandela at the age of 95, we begin to enter a period where people really deal with the psychological, cultural and political consequences of the grandfather of the nation passing on. >> will there be new divisions? i'm not thinking about culture, i just don't know enough biabou it but i wonder about politics, business and the
. >> the official mourning of nelson mandela has begun. president obama and mrs. obama will attend the furniture on tuesday. it's part of a series of events planned to honour the leader. >> i'm john henry smith, we'll look on a championship saturday in college football. the day that stood up for d.c. s. >> al jazeera continues in 2.5 minutes. i'm morgan radford. i'll be back with all the top stories. >> troops on the ground. hundreds of french troops sent to the central african republic trying to restore order. anti-government protesters in the ukraine call for a million-man march trying to get rid of the government. in a day of mourning nelson mandela's ex-wife attended a church service to pay tribe ute to a government. gold snap across the city - smart lander at a stand still. freezing rain and heavy snow - cold snap. >> good morning, welcome to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford, live in new york city. the french president issued a veiled warning to the president of the central african republic, francis hollande saying it will be tough to keep him in place given the violence or the ground
mandela with great fondness and great respect, but few knew him as well as bill clinton. joining us now, the former president of the united states, bill clinton. mr. president, thanks very much for sharing some thoughts on this special day. >> i'm glad to do it, wolf. >> what was it like the first time you met nelson mandela? >> well, i was excited. i felt almost like i was 20 years old again. it was at the democratic convention in new york. i was about to be nominated for president and former mayor david dinkins, a long-time supporter of mandela's, brought him up to our room where he met with hillary, chelsea and me. we hit it off right away. he was there really because he was an incredibly loyal person to anyone who supported him and the anc during his long imprisonment and democrats had supported sanctions on south africa so he wanted to be there, he wanted to be at our convention. he later came to the inauguration. and then hillary and vice president gore led a delegation to his inauguration in '94 and just five months later, he came to the united states on a state visit. that's whe
to nelson mandela. on board air force one with president and mrs. obama, president george wurks bush and first lady laura bush and former secretary of state hillary clinton. on the way to south africa, they gathered together in the plane's conference room telling their stories that spanned three presidential administrations. president's clinton and carter are traveling separately to johannesburg. the last time these presidents were all together was in april at the opening of the george w. bush presidential library, but this event in a foreign country will mean much greater security concerned. sources involved in planning president clinton's prim to the funeral of israel prime minister rabin, and the funeral of pope john paul ii tells cnn it decrease nerve-racking to depend on a foreign country. >> they do a lot of planning and they're very good at this. the south africans have challenges, in addition to security, logistical challenges. >> reporter: the memorial service will take place in a soccer stadium that holds 90,000 people. more than 90 world leaders are expected to attend. lea
president obama, mrs. obama president bush and his wife will travel together. local leaders feel a special connection to the legacy. tom sherwood has more on how mandela's work helped shape the people shaping our community today. >> reporter: josh williams for 30 years led the metropolitan labor council. he still gets gidy when he talks about meeting mandela here in 1990. >> i would say it's such an honor to meet you madiba. i didn't say mandela, i said madiba. don't ask me why, it just came out of my mouth. >> reporter: the colorful posters from 1994 when he was an election watcher in south africa. he likes the picture taken with mandela at the cia headquarters because of his fierce support for labor. >> that to me is the picture i will always cherish. he was in the house of labor. >> reporter: d.c. congresswoman eleanor holmes norton has her own memories. she was among four that helped spark demonstrations to bring about reform in south africa and freedom for trade leaders there. she said it was time to celebrate his long and worthy life of making life bett
or a policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. >> reporter: as a senator obama had visited mandela, and the president and mrs. obama brought their doubters to robben island prison so they could better understand what mandela had suffered. after he died, michelle obama tweeted we will forever draw strength and inspiration from nelson mandela's extraordinary example of moral courage, kindness and humility. bill clinton tweeted a picture and wrote, "i will never forget my friend madibaa," use the affectionate name by which mandela was known to his followers. mandela wasn't always on the u.s. side. in the 1980s president reagan supported apartheid regime, and eastern as protests broke out an college campuses across america demanding the u.s. punish the regime. ♪ ♪ free mandela >> reporter: "free nelson mandela" became a popular anthem for black and white americans. finally, congress, including key republicans, overrode reagan's veto imposing the economic sanctions that helped break the apartheid regime. that set the stage for mandela's triumphant visit to washington as his country'
to go before reaching the south pole. >>> president obama and mrs. obama left washington a short time ago. on "face the nation" yesterday bob schieffer focused mandela's life. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> i loved the show how you started with maya angelou and ended with the poem she had written for him because it so brilliantly captured his life and what it meant. >> she is an amazing person in her own right. >> i think so too. >> when i called her last week and asked her to be on i thought -- she's not in the best of health. she can't travel very much and she said, no i'll do it because i want to. and then i found autoout she had written this poem. she didn't tell us. she told us on the show when the state department asked her to do this not to disclose it for -- until 48 hours after he was dead. >> how did you get gayle king to do it? >> you know that was an e-mail from bob schieffer to gayle king. yeah. what they're saying in south africa, though today about him while they're grieving, of course they're also celebrating. i saw one woman wh
will attend the memorial service. the bushes will travel to south africa with president and mrs. obama on air force one. also word that former president bill clinton will be there as well. he has been talking about nelson mandela's legacy. president clinton telling fox news's ed henry that mandela gave him advice during the monica lewinski scandal, interestingly enough. he says that mandela, who spent 27 years in prison, taught him not to hate his enemies. >> i said, didn't you hate those people when you went in? i seen the pictures of you as a young man. you were really mad. he said, i realized they could take everything from me, everything except my mind and my heart. those things i would have to give them, and he said i decided not to give them away. and he looked right at me and he said, "neither should you." the heat was really being turned up in congress, and mbeki looked at me and he said, madiba told me to give you a message. he said i have no earthly idea what it means, but you would know what it means. i said what did he tell you? he said i should remind you not to give them away. >
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)